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Indianola

Service Above Self

We meet Fridays at 12:00 PM
Indianola Country Club
1610 Country Club Road
Indianola, IA  50125
United States of America
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Water and Sanitation

Month

 

Barry Rassin

RI President 2018-19

 

March 2019

 

One of the things I appreciate most about serving as president of Rotary International is the people I get to meet. Much of my time is spent traveling and visiting Rotary clubs around the world. A Rotarian welcome is something quite special. But let me tell you, there's nothing so warm as the welcomes that have been rolled out for me by Rotaractors. These are young people who are committed to Rotary ideals, who are pouring their hearts into service, and who, in the process, don't forget to have fun.

One of the highlights of my recent travels was a trip to Ghana, where I visited a district that boasts some 60 Rotaract clubs. They aren't satisfied with that number, though — in fact, they're excited about a plan to double it. They'll do it, too.

Rotaractors are vaccinating children against polio. They're donating blood where the supply is dangerously low. They're providing handwashing facilities to schools where children previously had no way to get clean. In short, they're all about transformational service: carrying out projects that make a real difference in their communities.

How Rotary has changed to help people get clean water for longer than just a few years

By Ryan Hyland

The lack of access to clean water, sanitation facilities, and hygiene resources is one of the world’s biggest health problems — and one of the hardest to solve.

Rotary has worked for decades to provide people with clean water by digging wells, laying pipes, providing filters, and installing sinks and toilets. But the biggest challenge has come after the hardware is installed. Too often, projects succeeded at first but eventually failed.  

Across all kinds of organizations, the cumulative cost of failed water systems in sub-Saharan Africa alone is estimated at $1.2 billion to $1.5 billion, according to data compiled by the consulting firm Improve International.

 

Rotary projects used to focus on building wells, but Rotary started to focused on hygiene education projects, which have a greater impact.

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